The VPN is dying, long live zero trust

The venerable VPN, which has for decades provided remote workers with a secure tunnel into the enterprise network, is facing extinction as enterprises migrate to a more agile, granular security framework called zero trust, which is better adapted to today’s world of digital business.VPNs are part of a security strategy based on the notion of a network perimeter; trusted employees are on the inside and untrusted employees are on the outside. But that model no longer works in a modern business environment where mobile employees access the network from a variety of inside or outside locations, and where corporate assets reside not behind the walls of an enterprise data center, but in multi-cloud environments.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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An SD-WAN service that gets around the Great Firewall of China legally

The saying goes that China is the world’s factory. For many companies around the world, their products or components of their products are produced in mainland China. At the same time, China’s population of more than a billion people makes it one of the world’s largest consumer markets. Thus, for either production or sales, many companies want to do business in China and have established facilities there.On the networking front, this means that multinational companies need to extend their wide area network into China to support their large or rapidly growing operations—and that’s easier said than done.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.]
Many organizations had done this using VPNs, but in early 2018, the Chinese government placed restrictions on IPsec traffic to basically block it from going in and out of the country. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said these restrictions are in accordance with the China Cross-border Data Telecommunications Industry Alliance (CDTIA), which was created to regulate cross-border data communication.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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A VPN service that gets around the Great Firewall of China legally

The saying goes that China is the world’s factory. For many companies around the world, their products or components of their products are produced in mainland China. At the same time, China’s population of more than a billion people makes it one of the world’s largest consumer markets. Thus, for either production or sales, many companies want to do business in China and have established facilities there.On the networking front, this means that multinational companies need to extend their wide area network into China to support their large or rapidly growing operations—and that’s easier said than done.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.]
Many organizations had done this using VPNs, but in early 2018, the Chinese government placed restrictions on IPsec traffic to basically block it from going in and out of the country. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said these restrictions are in accordance with the China Cross-border Data Telecommunications Industry Alliance (CDTIA), which was created to regulate cross-border data communication.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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WiFi Protection in Public Places

WiFi Internet has added much convenience to our daily lives, with its easy accessibility in public places such as restaurants, hotels, and cafes; malls, parks, and even in airplanes, where we can connect online for faster transactions and communication. Like any online technology, however, it’s vulnerable to hacker abuse, posing potential threats to you and…
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Gov’t warns on VPN security bug in Cisco, Palo Alto, F5, Pulse software

The Department of Homeland Security has issued a warning that some VPN packages from Cisco, Palo Alto, F5 and Pusle may improperly secure tokens and cookies, allowing nefarious actors an opening to invade and take control over an end user’s system. The DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) warning comes on the heels of a notice from Carnegie Mellon’s CERT that multiple VPN applications store the authentication and/or session cookies insecurely in memory and/or log files.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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Russia demands access to VPN providers’ servers

The Russian censorship agency Roskomnadzor has ordered 10 VPN service providers to link their servers in Russia to its network in order to stop users from reaching banned sites.If they fail to comply, their services will be blocked, according to a machine translation of the order.RELATED: Best VPN routers for small business
The 10 VPN  providers are ExpressVPN, HideMyAss!, Hola VPN, IPVanish, Kaspersky Secure Connection NordVPN, OpenVPN, VPN Unlimited and VyprVPN.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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Insecure VPNs: Top risks and symptoms that stronger security is needed

Virtual private networks, or VPNs, were created to provide a secure tunnel in which user activity can be carried out in privacy. In this way, VPNs have been utilized by individual users, as well as to support business processes for several years, and their use is only growing. According to current statistics, nearly 25 percent…
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That VPN may not be as secure as you think

If you’re a VPN subscriber and have ever wondered just how secure the supposedly encrypted pipe that you’re using through the internet is — and whether the anonymity promise made by the VPN provider is indeed protecting your privacy— well, your hunches may be correct. It turns out several of these connections are not secure.Academics say they’ve discovered a whopping 13 programming errors in 61 separate VPN systems tested recently. The configuration bungles “allowed Internet traffic to travel outside the encrypted connection,” the researchers say.The independent research group, made up of computer scientists from UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Spain’s Madrid Institute of Advanced Studies (IMDEA) with International Computer Science Institute, write in the Conversation this month, some of which is redistributed by Homeland Security Newswire, that six of 200 VPN services also scandalously monitored user traffic. That’s more serious than unintended leaks, the team explains — users trust providers not to snoop. The point of a VPN is to be private and not get monitored. VPN use ranges from companies protecting commercial secrets on public Wi-Fi to dissidents.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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