Why the cloud will never eat the data center

Sometimes it’s hard to see gradual changes in technology paradigms because they’re gradual.  Sometimes it helps to play “Just suppose…” and see where it leads. So, just suppose that the cloud did what some radical thinkers say, and “absorbed the network”. That’s sure an exciting tag line, but is this even possible, and how might it come about?Companies are already committed to a virtual form of networking for their WAN services, based on VPNs or SD-WAN, rather than building their own WANs from pipes and routers.  That was a big step, so what could be happening to make WANs even more virtual, to the point where the cloud could subsume them?  It would have to be a data-center change.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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How the network can support zero trust

Simply stated, zero trust calls for verifying every user and device that tries to access the network and enforcing strict access-control and identity management that limits authorized users to accessing only those resources they need to do their jobs.Zero trust is an architecture, so there are many potential solutions available, but this is a look at those that fit in the realm of networking.[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.]
Least privilege
One broad principle of zero trust is least privilege, which is granting individuals access to just enough resources to carry out their jobs and nothing more. One way to accomplish this is network segmentation, which breaks the network into unconnected sections based on authentication, trust, user role, and topology. If implemented effectively, it can isolate a host on a segment and minimize its lateral or east–west communications, thereby limiting the “blast radius” of collateral damage if a host is compromised. Because hosts and applications can reach only the limited resources they are authorized to access, segmentation prevents attackers from gaining a foothold into the rest of the network.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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Tempered Networks simplifies secure network connectivity and microsegmentation

The TCP/IP protocol is the foundation of the internet and pretty much every single network out there. The protocol was designed 45 years ago and was originally only created for connectivity. There’s nothing in the protocol for security, mobility, or trusted authentication.The fundamental problem with TCP/IP is that the IP address within the protocol represents both the device location and the device identity on a network. This dual functionality of the address lacks the basic mechanisms for security and mobility of devices on a network.This is one of the reasons networks are so complicated today. To connect to things on a network or over the internet, you need VPNs, firewalls, routers, cell modems, etc. and you have all the configurations that come with ACLs, VLANs, certificates, and so on. The nightmare grows exponentially when you factor in internet of things (IoT) device connectivity and security. It’s all unsustainable at scale.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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Durham County goes Cisco for enterprise network ops and security proficiency

The government in Durham County, N.C., was spending hours and hours manually provisioning its network and keeping security policies current, so it decided two and a half years ago to upgrade for the sake of efficiency and security.Since then, the government’s IT staff of four has migrated its traditional point-to-point network to a more modern enterprise featuring the software-defined technologies of Cisco’s Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) and DNA Center that support its 2,100 enterprise end users and online services for 315,000 county residents.  [ Read also: How to plan a software-defined data center network ]
As a result, time spend on certain manual chores has plummeted, freeing up staff time for forward-looking projects.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story) READ MORE HERE…

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SDNs and NFV are complementary and core components of modernized networks

The terms software defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) are often used interchangeably, which is incorrect.  In a sense, the two are tied together as companies start using NFV as part of their SDN plans but that doesn’t have to be the case.Enterprises could maintain their current network architecture and shift to NFV or they could roll out an SDN and never leverage the benefits of NFV, so it’s important to understand what each is and the benefits of both.[ For more on SDN see where SDN is going and learn the difference between SDN and NFV. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]
What is software-defined Networking
SDNs are a fundamentally different way to think about networks.  Technically, SDNs can be defined as the separation of the management, control and data-forwarding planes of networks.  Many people, including technical individuals read that definition and say, “So what?”, but the separation of these planes has a profound impact on networks and enables things that have never been done before.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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