GPUs are vulnerable to side-channel attacks

Computer scientists at the University of California at Riverside have found that GPUs are vulnerable to side-channel attacks, the same kinds of exploits that have impacted Intel and AMD CPUs.Two professors and two students, one a computer science doctoral student and a post-doctoral researcher, reverse-engineered a Nvidia GPU to demonstrate three attacks on both graphics and computational stacks, as well as across them. The researchers believe these are the first reported side-channel attacks on GPUs.[ Read also: What are the Meltdown and Spectre exploits? | Get regularly scheduled insights: Sign up for Network World newsletters ]
A side-channel attack is one where the attacker uses how a technology operates, in this case a GPU, rather than a bug or flaw in the code. It takes advantage of how the processor is designed and exploits it in ways the designers hadn’t thought of.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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How the L1 Terminal Fault vulnerability affects Linux systems

Announced just yesterday in security advisories from Intel, Microsoft and Red Hat, a newly discovered vulnerability affecting Intel processors (and, thus, Linux) called L1TF or “L1 Terminal Fault” is grabbing the attention of Linux users and admins. Exactly what is this vulnerability and who should be worrying about it?L1TF, L1 Terminal Fault, and Foreshadow
The processor vulnerability goes by L1TF, L1 Terminal Fault, and Foreshadow. Researchers who discovered the problem back in January and reported it to Intel called it “Foreshadow”. It is similar to vulnerabilities discovered in the past (such as Spectre).This vulnerability is Intel-specific. Other processors are not affected. And like some other vulnerabilities, it exists because of design choices that were implemented to optimize kernel processing speed but exposed data in ways that allowed access by other processes.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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Study shows admins are doing a terrible job of patching servers

Open source has taken over the server side of things, but admins are doing a terrible job of keeping the software patched and up to date.Black Duck Software, a developer of auditing software for open-source security, has released its annual Open Source Security and Risk Analysis, which finds enterprise open source to be full of security vulnerabilities and compliance issues.[ For more on IoT security see our corporate guide to addressing IoT security concerns. | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]
According to the study, open-source components were found in 96% of the applications the company scanned last year, with an average of 257 instances of open source code in each application.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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IBM tweaks its z14 mainframe to make it a better physical fit for the data center

IBM is widening its mainframe range with some narrower models – ZR1 and Rockhopper II – that are skinny enough to fit in a standard 19-inch rack, which will answer criticisms of potential customers that the hulking z14 introduced in July 2017 too big to fit in their data centers (see photo above).In addition to new, smaller, packaging for its z14 hardware, IBM is also introducing Secure Service Container technology. This makes use of the z14’s encryption accelerator and other security capabilities to protect containerized applications from unwanted interference.[ Check out REVIEW: VMware’s vSAN 6.6 and hear IDC’s top 10 data center predictions . | Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters. ]
When IBM introduced the z14 last July, with an accelerator to make encrypting information standard practice in the data center, there was one problem: The mainframe’s two-door cabinet was far too deep and too wide to fit in standard data center aisles.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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