RSA: Intel reference design to accelerate SASE, other security tasks

Intel has introduced a reference design it says can enable accelerator cards for security workloads including secure access service edge (SASE), IPsec, and SSL/TLS.The upside of the server cards would be offloading some application processing from CPUs, effectively increasing server performance without requiring additional server rack space, according to Intel.
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The announcement was made at RSA Conference 2022, and details were published in a blog post by Bob Ghaffardi, Intel vice president and general manager of the Enterprise and Cloud Division.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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RSA: Cisco launches SASE, offers roadmap for other cloud-based services

Cisco made a variety of security upgrades at the RSA Conference designed to move security operation to the cloud, improve its Secure Access Service Edge offering and offer new simplified security end point control.The biggest piece of the Cisco roll out was a new overarching security platform called the Cisco Security Cloud will include unified management and policies, and offer open APIs to help grow a multivendor security ecosystem. Cisco defines the  Security Cloud as a “multi-year strategic vision for the future of security.” It is an ongoing journey that began several years ago and Cisco will continue delivering upon the key tenets of this vision with a consistent roadmap. The cloud will be made up of existing products like Umbrella and offerings from Duo, other features will be developed in the future.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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Who is selling Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA) and what do you get?

Enterprise interest in Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA) has soared over the past two years among organizations trying to enable secure anywhere, anytime, any device access to IT resources for employees, contractors and third parties.Much of this interest has stemmed from organizations looking to replace VPNs as the primary remote access mechanism to their networks and data. But it is also being driven by organizations seeking to bolster security in an environment where enterprise data is scattered across on-premises and multi-cloud environments, and being accessed in more ways than ever before.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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6G cellular doesn’t exist, but it can be hacked

Arriving at a consensus on when 6G wireless will be widely available commercially is all but impossible, as this small sample size shows:
Northeastern University researchers: More than five years, but probably not long after
Nokia CEO Pekka Lundmark: Definitely by 2030
ABI Research: Sometime in the 2030s
A magic 8-ball I found in my basement: Reply hazy, try again

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Then there is this intriguing quatrain by 16th century French physician, astrologer and renowned seer Nostradamus:To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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SASE or SSE? Don’t let hype distract from enterprise needs

Secure access service edge (SASE) has generated a buzz over the last couple of years, particularly in light of the pandemic and its associated surge in remote employees. But SASE hasn’t quite materialized in the way Gartner – which first coined the term in a 2019 white paper – initially expected. In particular, there’s been pushback around the idea that SASE should be delivered by a single vendor, as a single integrated cloud service at the network edge.The SASE model combines network security functions with WAN capabilities, delivering the security elements in the cloud and using SD-WAN at the edge or in the cloud. Key security functions include secure web gateway (SWG), zero trust network access (ZTNA), firewall as a service (FWaaS), and cloud access security broker (CASB).To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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What is Nmap and why do you need it on your network?

Nmap, short for Network Mapper, is a free and open source tool used for vulnerability checking, port scanning and, of course, network mapping. Despite being created back in 1997, Nmap remains the gold standard against which all other similar tools, either commercial or open source, are judged.Nmap has maintained its preeminence because of the large community of developers and coders who help to maintain and update it. The Nmap community reports that the tool, which anyone can get for free, is downloaded several thousand times every week.To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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6 top network security threats and how to beat them

It’s a war zone out there. In the seemingly endless game of cyber cat and mouse, accurate intelligence remains the best tool for beating attackers at their own game.Here’s an analysis of today’s six top network threats and tips for how to identify and quash them.1. Ransomware
Ransomware is easily the greatest network threat, since it gives attackers the biggest bang for the buck with a relatively low probability of getting caught. “There’s also a low bar in the skill category to break into this sort of thing,” says Andy Rogers, a senior assessor at cybersecurity and compliance firm Schellman. “There are plenty of Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS) businesses that will be more than willing to ensure you have the tools you need to unleash a ransomware campaign.”To read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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Intel details IPU roadmap to free up CPUs

Intel is betting that future data-center operations will depend on increasingly powerful servers running ASIC-based, programable CPUs, and its wager rides on the development of infrastructure processing units (IPU), which are Intel’s programmable networking devices designed to reduce overhead and free up performance for CPUs.
Read more: SmartNICs set to infiltrate enterprise networksTo read this article in full, please click here READ MORE HERE…

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